Stair Building Ideas For Design And Construction

Post To Post - Stair Handrailing

Post to post would be any part of the stairway or handrail that connects one post to another post. The black arrow in the picture below is pointing to a banister that is in between two posts. Some handrails use a bottom rail, instead of having balusters run all the way to the floor. If this was the case, you would have a post to post handrailing system with a top and bottom rail.

Disadvantages For Using Post To Post Connections

I can only think of two disadvantages. The first one would be a weaker handrailing, because you wouldn't be able to install a thicker newel post in between a long span. Could you imagine how weak the handrail in the picture above would be, if it didn't have a center supporting newel post?

The other disadvantage would be that you wouldn't be able to continually run your hand along the top of the banister. This could create a problem for anyone who is using the top of a banister to support them as they're walking.


Advantages For Using Post To Post Connection

Shorter banisters could reduce the possibility of a banister warping or twisting, simply because of its length. It's difficult to notice a bowed banister that was installed in between two posts that are less than 8 feet apart. However, a 12 foot banister with a blow in it, sticks out like a sore thumb

I already mentioned the second advantage, but I will mention it again. A post to post connection provides you with more structural strength.

There is something else that I need to mention. You can build a handrail without using a banister in between, a post to post connection and still end up with a continuous banister. The most common method for building this would be by using a 4x4 post and a 2 x 6 banister that goes over each individual supporting post.

This is a common handrail system that's used for decks and outdoor stairs.


Stairs / Stair Glossary

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