Stair Building Ideas For Design And Construction

Splice Plate - Framing And Stair Building

A splice plate is usually referred to a butt joint where two wall framing plates joined together, at their edges. The picture below provide you with an excellent example of a splice plate that was used on a structural shear wall. Usually a splice plate will require an additional framing plate to join the splice together. That's why most walls are framed with two top plates.

Benefits Of Using Splice Plates For Building Stairs

Every once in while you're going to need to join to stair stringers together. For example, you're building a 50 foot stairway and the longest board you can purchase is 20 foot long.

You will need to use a splice plate and an additional stringer or nailer to join each break, in the stair stringers together. Splice plates can also be used for landing, handrails, walls, plywood, treads and risers.


Proper Planning Reduces Splice Plates

When ever I'm figuring out the amount of lumber I need to build a home, I will often try to reduce the amount of splice plates or wall breaks if possible. All you need to do is measure the lengths of your walls and order your lumber accordingly.

For example, if I have five walls that are 19 foot long, 12 walls that are 10 feet long and six walls that are 8 feet long, I can order all of my top plate wall framing materials, in 20 foot, 10 foot or 8 foot lengths.

Whenever you're planning on building a stairway or home, make sure that you create a construction plan that works efficiently. If you're not sure about how a particular part of the building is going to work, put a little more thought into it, until you do.


Stairs / Stair Glossary

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